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LEARN KOREAN LANGUAGE

Expressions

Greetings, Thanks and Other Expressions
(1) 안녕? An-nyeong?
(Very casual – not used among adults)
Hi!
(2) 안녕하세요? (Honorific)
An-nyeong-ha-se-yo?
How are you?
(3) 안녕하십니까? (Honorific, formal)
An-nyeong-ha-sim-ni-kka?
How are you?
(4) 만나서 반가워. (Casual)
Man-na-seo ban-ga-wo
Nice to meet you.
(5) 만나서 반갑습니다. (Formal)
Man-na-seo ban-gap-seum-ni-da
Pleased to meet you.
(6) 처음 뵙겠습니다. (Formal)
Cheo-eum boep-get-seum-ni-da.
It’s a pleasure to meet you.
(Lit. First time see you)
(7) 오래간만입니다. (Formal)
Oraeganmanimnida.
It’s been a long time.
(8) 오래간만이에요.
Oraeganmanieyo.
Long time no see.
(9) 어떻게 지내세요?
Eo-tteo-ke-ji-nae-se-yo?
How are you doing?
(10) 잘 지내요.
Jal-ji-nae-yo.
I am fine.
(11) 그저 그래요.
Geu-jeo-geu-rae-yo.
So-so.
(12) 또 뵙겠습니다. (Formal)
Tto-poep-ge-sseum-ni-da.
Hope to see you again.
(13) 미안합니다. (Formal)
Mi-an-ham-ni-da.
I’m sorry.
(14) 늦어서 미안합니다. (Formal)
Neoj-eo-seo mi-an-ham-ni-da.
I am sorry, I’m late.
(15) 괜찮습니다. (Formal)
Gwaen-chan-sseum-ni-da.
It’s all right.
(16) 괜찮아. (Casual)
Gwaen-chan-a-yo.
It’s O.K.
(17) 감사합니다.
Gam-sa-ham-ni-da.
Thank you.
(18) 고맙습니다.
Go-map-seum-ni-da.
Thank you.
(19) 고마워. (Casual)
Go-ma-wo.
Thanks.
(20) 뭘요.
Mwol-yo.
You’re welcome.
(21) 아니예요.
A-ni-ye-yo.
You’re welcome.
(Lit. It is not.)
(22) 네/예.
Ne/Ye.
Yes.
(23) 응/어.
Eung/eo.
Yeah.
(24) 저기요.
Jeo-gi-yo.
Excuse me.
(25) 잠깐만요/잠시만요.
Jam-kkan-man-yo/Jam-si-man-yo.
Wait a minute, please.
(26) 아니요/ 아뇨.
A-ni-yo/A-nyo.
No.
(27) 아니.
A-ni.
Nope./Nah.
(28) 잘 가. (Casual)
Jal ga.
Goodbye
(to someone leaving)
(29) 안녕히 가세요. (Honorific)
An-nyeong-hi ga-se-yo.
Goodbye
(to someone leaving)
(30) 안녕히 가십시오.(Honorific, formal)
An-nyeong-hi ga-sip-si-o.
Goodbye
(to someone leaving)
(31) 잘 있어. (Casual)
Jal iss-eo.
Goodbye
(to someone staying)
(32) 안녕히 계세요. (Honorific)
An-nyeong-hi gye-se-yo.
Goodbye
(to someone staying)
(33) 안녕히 계십시오.(Honorific, formal)
An-nyeong-hi gye-sip-si-o.
Goodbye
(to someone staying)

Learn Korean

Addressing Peers at School

Addressing Peers at School: seonbaeand
hubae
In Korea, age is very important in establishing the relationship between
speakers. Therefore, when you are at university, you will address people in
the years above or below you with special titles.
The title for someone in a year above you is ‘선배 (seonbae)’ and ‘후배
(hubae)’ is used for someone in a lower year level. For example, if you are
a 2nd year student, you are the ‘seonbae’ of a 1st year student and ‘hubae’ of
a 3rd year student.
If you are not very close to a person in an older year level, you would add
the respectful ‘님 (nim)’ to the title, so that they are called ‘seonbae-nim’.
However, if you are very close to someone in an older year, you may also
one of the kinship terms (hyeong, nuna, eonni, oppa )

Learn Korean

Korean Names

Korean Names
Korean names consist of a family name followed by a given name. Most
Korean given names are comprised of two syllables, though some only have
one.
The three most common family names in Korea are 김 (Kim), 이 (Yi, often
written Lee), and 박 (Park). Together, these three names account for around
45% of the population.
Family name groups are divided by patrilineal decent into branches or clans.
(There are about 280 such branches of Kim). Until recently, it was illegal
for people of the same branch to marry, no matter how distantly related.
Branches are usually identified by a place name where the clan is said to
have originated, such as ‘Kyeongju Kim’.
Common Korean family names:
김 이 박 최 정 조 장
Kim Yi Pak Choe Cheong Cho Chang
윤 신 한 홍 유 강 송
Yun Sin Han Hong Yu Kang Song
Korean given names are typically comprised of Sino-Korean characters,
한자 (hanja), traditionally chosen with the help of a fortune-teller. Some
parents now give their children names that can only be written in the Korean
alphabet, 한글 (hangeul).
UNIT 1 안녕하세요? 15
Below are the top five baby names for boys and girls in 2006, often used in
television dramas:
남자
(Male)
민준 민재 지훈 현우 준서
Minjun Minjae Jihun Hyeonu Junseo
여자
(Female)
서연 민서 수빈 서현 민지
Seoyeon Minseo Subin Seohyeon Minji
The following are common names in 1975 and 1945 respectively. Note the
female names from 1945 end with ‘ja’, equivalent to the ‘ko’ common in
Japanese female names. This reflects the Japanese colonial period, which
ended in that year:
1975 남자 (Male) 정훈 성호 성훈
Jeonghun Seongho Seonghun
여자 (Female) 미영 은정 은주
Miyeong Eunjeong Eunju
1945 남자 (Male) 영수 영호 영식
Yeongsu Yeongho Yeongsik
여자 (Female) 영자 정자 순자
Yeongja Jeongja Sunj

LEARN KOREAN LANGUAGE

Am, Is, Are

+i-e-yo/ye-yo ‘am’; ‘are’; ‘is’
We use ending +이에요 (i-e-yo) or +예요 (ye-yo) when we want to say
who someone is. In English, you have to change the verb ‘to be’ depending
on who you are talking about. For example “I am…”, “You are…”, “She is
…”, “They are…”. However, in Korean, the change is dependant on the last
letter of the person’s name is a vowel or consonant.
If the noun ends in a vowel: +예요 (ye-yo)
저는 김민서예요. I am Minseo Kim.
Jeo-neun Kim Minseo-ye-yo.
If it ends in a consonant: +이에요 (i-e-yo)
저는 김민준이에요. I am Minjun Kim.
Jeo-neun Kim Minjun-i-e-yo.
This structure has the general form ‘A is B’ (when B is a noun and not an
adjective) and is therefore widely used. Note that A must be a noun,
pronoun or wh-question word, and B must be a noun and not an adjective.
For example, you cannot use this form to say “He is stupid”. You will study
this in more detail further on.
The very casual version of +이에요 (i-e-yo) or +예요 (ye-yo) is +이야 (i-ya)
or +야 (ya) which follow the exactly same rule explained above. The formal
version however has only one form, +입니다 (im-ni-da).
Noun + i-e-yo/ye-yo (Polite)
Noun + i-ya/ya (Casual)
Noun + im-ni-da (Formal)

LEARN KOREAN LANGUAGE

Introducing

Introducing Yourself
After greeting somebody for the first time, you can say:
만나서 반갑습니다. It’s nice to meet you.
Man-na-seo ban-gap-seum-ni-da.
OR
처음 뵙겠습니다. I’m pleased to meet you.
Cheo-eum boep-get-seum-ni-da.
And then introduce yourself:
Robert 입니다. (I) am Robert.
Robert-im-ni-da.
Robert 라고 합니다. (I) am Robert. (Lit. I am called ‘Robert’.)
Robert-ra-go ham–ni-da.
You may have noticed that the pronoun ‘I’ is omitted, as is normally the
case in Korean sentences where the subject is obvious.
When referring to the person you are addressing, the Korean pronoun for
‘you’ is almost never used:
Robert 니? Are (you) Robert?
Robert-ni? (Casual)

Introducing Others
When introducing somebody, you can use:
(이분은) 김 선생님이세요. (Honorific)
I-bun-eun Kim Seon-saeng-nim-i-se-yo
This (distinguished person) is Mr. Kim.
(이쪽은) John 이에요. (Polite)
I-tchog-eun John-i-e-yo.
This (person) is John.
제 친구 Paul 입니다. (Formal)
Je chin-gu ‘Paul’-im-n-ida.
This is my friend, Paul.
Paul 이야. (Casual)
‘Paul’-i-ya.
This is Paul.
You will notice that the term for ‘this (person)’ is different in each sentence,
and so is the final ending. The term and ending used in the first sentence
show a greater level of respect, and are termed ‘honorific’. (이분은 literally
means ‘this distinguished person’, whereas 이쪽은 literally means ‘over
here’.) You can also introduce someone without saying “This is” in casual
speech. The use of different verb endings will be introduced in the next unit.

LEARN KOREAN LANGUAGE

Greetings

Greetings
There are three basic ways to greet someone in Korean, depending on what
degree of politeness and/or formality the situation requires:
안녕? (Very casual – not used among adults)
An-nyeong?
안녕하세요? (Honorific)
An-nyeong-ha-se-yo?
안녕하십니까? (Honorific, formal)
An-nyeong-ha-sim-ni-kka?
1) Generally, you should use the honorific form:
Jack: 안녕하세요?
An-nyeong-ha-se-yo?
Olivia: 안녕하세요?
An-nyeong-ha-se-yo?
2) However, when a student greets a teacher, the formal expression can be
used:
Student: 선생님,1 안녕하십니까?
Seon-saeng-nim, an-nyeong-ha-sim-ni-kka?
Teacher: 안녕하세요?
An-nyeong-ha-se-yo?
3) And when two young people bump into each other on the street, they can
just say 안녕? (An-nyeong?).